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Safety

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Safety

Keeping your Babies Safe

Babies stay safer when their parents are informed and involved in their care. Ask questions and talk to your Neonatal and Pediatric healthcare team. Working together is the best way to keep your Baby safe. Follow the safety tips and talk to your doctor or nurse if you have questions or concerns about any safety issues while you are at Hospital.

Why you need know about safety

  • Falls: Children can suffer serious injuries such as concussion and fractures if they fall when trying to climb out using footholds or objects left in the cot.
  • Strangulation: Infants can become trapped and strangled if their clothing gets snagged on parts of a cot that stick out (protrusions), or if their head becomes trapped between gaps.
  • Suffocation: Babies can become trapped and suffocate if they fall into gaps created by ill-fitting or additional mattresses, or if they are caught up in the fabric of soft toys and extra pillows and bumpers.
  • Entrapment: Infants can suffer injuries to their arms and legs if they become trapped between gaps.
  • SIDS( SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME)

Introduction

Likely the only time you will leave your baby or young child unattended is while he or she sleeps. The important thing is to make sure children are sleeping where they will be safe. For this, parents and caregivers must be aware of safe sleep practices.

The purpose is to protect the public by helping to address and prevent dangers to human health or safety that are posed by consumer products in india.Likely the only time you will leave your baby or young child unattended is while he or she sleeps. The important thing is to make sure children are sleeping where they will be safe. For this, parents and caregivers must be aware of safe sleep practices.

The purpose is to protect the public by helping to address and prevent dangers to human health or safety that are posed by consumer products in india.

General Sleep Safety Tips

The safest place for your baby to sleep is on his or her back, in a crib, cradle or bassinet. International guidelines recommends room sharing for the first six months of your baby’s life.

Babies and young children should never be placed to sleep on standard beds, water beds, air mattresses, couches, futons or armchairs. A baby can suffocate when sleeping on these unsafe surfaces.

There are reports of injuries and/or deaths related to the improper use of many products mentioned in this guide. Follow the safety tips provided to reduce the risk of injury or death related to the use of these products.

  • Put your baby on his or her back to sleep, both at nap time and at bedtime
  • Your baby’s crib should be completely empty, except for the crib’s mattress and fitted sheet.
  • Avoid the use of loose bedding or soft objects in your baby’s sleeping area. Products like these can be suffocation hazards and should not be placed where your baby sleeps:
    • comforters, heavy blankets and quilts
    • infant or adult pillows
    • foam padding
    • stuffed toys
    • bumper pads
    • sleep positioners
  • Blankets can be dangerous if a baby’s head gets covered when he or she sleeps and may cause suffocation. Instead of a blanket, consider dressing your baby in light sleep clothing, like a one-piece sleeper. If a blanket is needed, infants are safest with a thin, lightweight, and breathable blanket. Overheating is a risk factor for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). If the room temperature is comfortable for you, it is also comfortable for your baby with same clothing as you are wearing.
  • Keep your home completely smoke free. Cigarette smoke is harmful to babies and increases the risk of SIDS. No one should smoke near your baby.
  • It is not safe for a baby to sleep for long periods of time in products such as strollers, car seats, swings, bouncers, slings or baby carriers, that keep him or her in a seated or semi-reclined position. Move your baby to a crib, cradle or bassinet for naps or overnight sleep, or once you have reached your destination.
  • Cords on window blinds, shades and curtains are a strangulation hazard. Tie the cords out of your child’s reach or install a tension device for looped cords. Whether the blind is up or down, make sure your child cannot reach the cords.
  • Place your baby’s sleeping area so that hazards like windows, patio doors, lamps, candles, electrical plugs, corded baby monitors, extension cords and small objects are out of your child’s reach.
  • Not everyone will take the same care you do in making sure their home is safe for children. When visiting family and friends, scan your surroundings for potential hazards and supervise your children closely.
  • Check regularly for recalls of children’s toys, clothing, furniture and equipment . Create Safe Places for a Baby to Sleep.

International Public Health communityrecommends room sharing for the first six months of your baby’s life. Room sharing is when you place your baby to sleep in a crib, cradle or bassinet that is within arm’s reach of where you sleep. Research has shown that it is good for babies to share a room with one or more caregivers, and that it may reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Remember that room sharing is not sufficient to ensure a safe sleep for your baby. You should follow all applicable safety tips, including the general sleep safety tips provided in the previous section. In particular:

  • Place your baby on his or her back to sleep, both at naptime and at bedtime.
  • Avoid using bedside sleeping products with the sides lowered.
  • Cords on window blinds, shades and curtains are a strangulation hazard. Tie the cords high and out of your child’s reach or install a tension device for looped cords. Whether the blind is up or down, make sure your child cannot reach the cords.
  • Place your baby’s sleeping area so that hazards like windows, patio doors, lamps, candles, electrical plugs, corded baby monitors, extension cords and small objects are out of your child’s reach.
  • A bassinet that meets current safety regulations is an appropriate place for your baby to sleep until he or she reaches the maximum weight recommended by the manufacturer OR until your baby can roll over, whichever comes first. When your baby reaches this milestone, you should put him or her to sleep in a cradle or crib.

  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for setting up and using the bassinet. Only use parts provided by the manufacturer. Your baby’s bassinet should not be modified in any way.
  • Check often to make sure the bassinet’s hardware is secure and not damaged.
  • Check that there are no small parts on the bassinet that could be a choking hazard. Make sure there are no sharp points on the bassinet.
  • Check that the mattress is firm. Mattresses that are too soft or worn down in any area could create a gap where a baby’s face could become stuck, causing them to suffocate.
  • The bassinet mattress must not be thicker than 3.8 cm (1 1/2 in).
  • There must not be a gap of more than 3 cm between the mattress and any part of the bassinet’s sides. Push the mattress firmly against the sides of the bassinet to test this.
  • If the bassinet has removable fabric over the frame, check often to make sure the fabric is securely attached to the frame.
  • Avoid the use of loose bedding or soft objects in your baby’s bassinet. Things like comforters, quilts, heavy blankets, infant pillows, adult pillows, foam padding, stuffed toys, bumper pads and sleep positionersshould not be in your baby’s sleeping area
  • A blanket should not be draped over the bassinet to keep light out. This could restrict air flow, or the blanket could fall on a baby’s face, causing them to suffocate.
  • Use a fitted bottom sheet made specifically for a bassinet mattress of the same size.
  • Place your baby’s bassinet so that hazards like windows, patio doors, lamps, candles, electrical plugs, corded baby monitors, extension cords and small objects are out of your child’s reach.
  • A cradle that meets today’s safety regulations is an appropriate place for your baby to sleep until he or she reaches the maximum weight recommended by the manufacturer OR until your baby can push up on his or her hands and knees, whichever comes first. When your baby reaches this milestone, you should put him or her to sleep in a crib.

  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for setting up and using the cradle. Only use parts provided by the manufacturer. Your baby’s cradle should not be modified in any way.
  • Check often to make sure that the cradle’s hardware is securely fastened and not damaged.
  • Do not use cradles with decorative cut-outs, corner posts that are more than 3 mm (1/8 in) in height or large spaces between the bars (spacing should be no more than 6 cm [2 3/8 in]).
  • Check that there are no small parts on the cradle that could be a choking hazard. Make sure there are no sharp points on the cradle.
  • Check that the mattress is firm. Mattresses that are too soft or worn down in any area could create a gap where a baby’s face could become stuck, causing them to suffocate.
  • The cradle mattress must not be thicker than 3.8 cm (1 1/2 in).
  • There must not be a gap of more than 3 cm (1 3/16 in) between the mattress and any part of the cradle’s sides. Push the mattress firmly against the sides of the cradle to test this.
  • Avoid the use of loose bedding or soft objects in your baby’s cradle. Things like comforters, quilts, heavy blankets, infant pillows, adult pillows, foam padding, stuffed toys and sleep positioners should not be in your baby’s sleeping area.
  • Use a fitted bottom sheet made specifically for a cradle mattress of the same size.
  • Place your baby’s cradle so that hazards like windows, patio doors, lamps, candles, electrical plugs, corded baby monitors, extension cords and small objects are out of your child’s reach
  • A crib that meets current safety regulations is the safest place for your baby to sleep. A crib should not be used if the child is taller than 90 cm or if he or she is able to climb out of it, whichever comes first. When your baby reaches this milestone, you should put him or her to sleep in a toddler or standard bed.

  • Do not use a crib made before September 1986 as it does not meet current safety regulations. Also, cribs older than ten years are more likely to have broken, worn, loose or missing parts, and to be missing warnings or instructions. I would strongly discourage to use second hand or used cribs.
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for putting together and using the crib. Only use parts provided by the manufacturer. Your baby’s crib should not be modified in any way.
  • Check often to make sure that the crib’s hardware is securely fastened and not damaged.
  • Do not use cribs with decorative cut-outs, corner posts that are more than 3mm (1/8 in) in height (unless they are over 406 mm (16 in) in height) or large spaces between the bars (spacing should be no more than 6 cm [2 3/8 in]).
  • Check that the mattress is firm. Mattresses that are too soft or worn down in any area could create a gap where a baby’s face could become stuck, causing them to suffocate.
  • The crib mattress must not be thicker than 15 cm (6 in).
  • There must not be a gap of more than 3 cm (1 3/16 in) between the mattress and any part of the crib’s sides. Push the mattress firmly against the sides of the crib to test this.
  • Check often that the crib’s mattress support system is secure. Shake the crib from side to side, thump the mattress from the top and push up hard on the mattress support from underneath the crib. The mattress support system should hold the mattress firmly in place.
  • If the crib has movable sides, after placing your baby in the crib, make sure both sides are upright and locked in place.
  • Avoid the use of loose bedding or soft objects in your baby’s crib. Things like comforters, quilts, blankets, infant pillows, adult pillows, foam padding, stuffed toys, bumper pads and sleep positioners should not bein your baby’s sleeping area.
  • Use a fitted bottom sheet made specifically for a crib mattress of the same size.
  • Remove mobiles and toy bars as soon as your baby begins to push up on his or her hands and knees.
  • Place the mattress support in its lowest position as soon as your baby can push up on his or her hands and knees. Never harness or tie your baby in a crib. Your baby should not be left in a crib with a necklace, elastic band, scarf or pacifier on a long cord. These items could cause strangulation.
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